In my latest New Yorker piece, I consider Holy Land author D.J. Waldie’s latest book, Becoming Los Angeles: Myth, Memory, and a Sense of Place: In 1993, five years after Joan Didion left California for New York, an assignment for The New Yorker brought her back to her home state…
Malcolm Gladwell once described his typical reader as "a 45-year-old guy with three kids who’s an engineer at some company outside of Atlanta." That sa…
The MIT Technology Review recently put out an issue on cities. When asked for a contribution, I realized I could take the opportunity to write an essay…
"Don't set out to raze all shrines — you'll frighten men," declares Ellsworth Toohey, villain of Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead. "Enshrine mediocrity — an…
Since moving to Seoul in 2015, I’ve written the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog, mostly covering Korean literature, cinema, current events, and…
When I fantasize about living in Oklahoma City, I mentally install myself in the Regency Tower, a 24-story downtown apartment building put up in the la…
When Jan Morris died this past November, her fellow writer of place Pico Iyer saluted her on Twitter as "the kindest, shrewdest and most indefatigable …
Since moving to Seoul in 2015, I’ve written the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog on South Korean literature, cinema, current events, and daily l…
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