Why doesn't North America have a London or Paris? An architect-critic explains
The late Slouching Towards Bethlehem author reports from less a "wicked pastel boomtown" than a bitter and paranoid tropical fever dream
My latest piece for the Los Angeles Review of Books is on Tokyo Junkie: 60 Years of Bright Lights and Back Alleys… and Baseball, a memoir by American…
London is a world city. Los Angeles, where I used to live, is less a world city than, as I once saw a banner at the airport call it, a "city that's a…
I moved from Los Angeles to Seoul a bit over six years ago, and it wouldn't be much of an exaggeration to say I did so because Seoul has the better…
Donald Richie closes his most personal book on Tokyo by quoting from his own diary. The entry dates from the summer of 1978, more than twenty years…
I've just returned from a few weeks in Toronto, a city with which I find myself in a not-quite-expected relationship. It started seven years ago, when a…
Even though I moved to Los Angeles 40 years after the publication of Reyner Banham’s Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies, the book still…
Luchino Visconti's White Nights (Le notti bianche) loosely adapts the eponymous Dostoevsky short story, transposing it from Saint Petersburg into the…
In my latest New Yorker piece, I consider Holy Land author D.J. Waldie’s latest book, Becoming Los Angeles: Myth, Memory, and a Sense of Place: In 1993…
Malcolm Gladwell once described his typical reader as "a 45-year-old guy with three kids who’s an engineer at some company outside of Atlanta." That…
The MIT Technology Review recently put out an issue on cities. When asked for a contribution, I realized I could take the opportunity to write an essay…